2019 Symposium Chester

The Cycling and Society Research Group Annual Symposium 2019 will be joint for the second edition with the Scientists For Cycling Network (European Cyclists Federation)

The Symposium entitled “Cycling, Society and Social Justice” will be hosted by the Department of Social and Political Science, University of Chester, UK.

The call for abstracts is here, and the book of abstracts.

Download here (pdf) the FINAL programme outline.

Presentations will be uploaded as soon as available:

2nd September 2019

Nikki Pugh. The Orrery for landscape, sinew and serendipity
Plenary
Graham Weaver (BREN) Social enterprise, inclusivity and cycling

Session 1
– Nick Marks (University of Brighton) Bicycle Workshops: the effects of learning technical skills in a social environment on mental health recoveries
– Margot Abord de Chatillon (Ecole nationale des travaux publics de l’État (ENTPE)) Women in gear(s): exploring gender in the path to velonomy
– Katja Leyendecker (Northumbria University, Newcastle UK) Decision makers’ lines of argument with respect to democratising cycling

Parallel Session a
– Seamus Allison. Evaluation of Front-Line Staff e Bike Use Initiative at Nottingham City Council
– Caroline Bartle and Steve Melia (University of the West of England) The rise of E-bikes in the UK: elitist or inclusive mobility?
– Ian Philips (University of Leeds) E-bikes – where do they offer greatest capability to reduce car miles travelled and what is the social context of these places?

Parallel Session b
– Síle Ginnane (Dublin Cycling Campaign) Women on Wheels Research Project: Insights into the Experiences of and Influences on Cycling in the Lives of Women in Dublin
– Jonathan Flower (UWE) Mobility Justice in Time and Space
– Patrick Steele Cycling and Social Inclusion: BME groups in Manchester

Plenary 2
Welcome from David Balsamo, Dean of the Faculty of Social Science

Andrew Reeves (University of Chester) From Safe Space to Trauma: The Psychological Impact of Cycling-Related Injuries

Session 3a
– Bruce Bennett (Lancaster University) The fine art of cycling. Politics, injustice and bicycle art.
– Mark Philbin (Dublin City University) Cycling, non-domination and the “freedom of the city”: a republican account
– Richard Laing (Robert Gordon University, Scotland) Anne Jensen (Aarhus University, Denmark) Urban mobility practices and uneven dispositions for cycling as normalized everyday transport

3rd September 2019

Session 4
– Kirsty Wild, Alistair Woodward, Rhys Jones (University of Auckland) Bike justice in Aotearoa New Zealand: How do we really make cycling inclusive, and what can cycling advocacy learn from other social justice movements?
– Robert Egan (Dublin City University) ‘Precarious Entitlement’ to Public Space: A State of Nature within a State of Civilisation
– Cosmin Popan (Manchester Metropolitan University) Embodied precariat and digital control in the ‘gig economy’: The mobile labour of Deliveroo cyclists

Session 5 Poster presentations

Session 6
– Patrice Nogues (Fédération des Usagers de la Bicyclette (FUB)) Analysis of French cyclists’ satisfaction through the first Bikeable Cities’ Barometer
– Tony Seaton Early cycling Life in Victorian London
– Vera Diogo, (Escola Superior de Educação – Instituto Politécnico do Porto) «Chaos in motion»: Porto through cyclers eyes

Session 7
– Alan Wong (University of Southampton) Transforming towards people-friendly cities and encouraging active mobility – lessons from the EU Horizon 2020 Metamorphosis Project
– Denis Robert Increasing the Cognitive Awareness of Automobile Drivers to Decrease the Mortality and Disability in Collisions with Cyclists
– Chris White (University of Chester) Understanding active travel as a public health issue: A sociological study amongst tiers of the Greater Manchester public health workforce

Session 8
– Arnon Ben Israel (Ben Gurion University of the Negev) Cycling immobility among urban Bedouin in the Negev
– Rebecca Cox (University of the West of England) How Accessible is a Typical UK Town Cycle Network to Disabled Cyclists?
– Graeme Sherriff, (University of Salford) Using Capability Theory to understand the inclusivity of Bike Share Scheme

For further information, please contact csrg@chester.ac.uk